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Using Lead for Everyday Items That You Might Not Know It Is In

Posted by on Jan 12, 2017 in Uncategorized |

Lead is a soft, malleable, and heavy metal that can be used in many applications but can be toxic with too much exposure. It tarnishes very quickly but is a great option for things that need to be resistant to rust or have some weight to them. There are many products that we use every day that contain lead.  Lead Roof Flashing Flashing used around vent pipes on your roof made be made from lead. The metal is soft so can be formed to fit the roof perfectly, and it is resistant to rust which helps it stand up to all kinds of weather. Most of the time, the flashing will have a lead sleeve formed into it that slides over the vent pipe to hold it all in place and ensure a seal at the roofline. Lead Fishing Weights If you have ever done any fishing, you know about these little weights called spit shot. The weights are basically balls made from lead that have a slot in them. You can place them on the monofilament fishing line and crimp them tightly around it with plies, and they will weigh the line down to drag it below the surface of the water. They are very effective and come in many different weights and sizes. Lead Shotgun Shot When you buy a shotgun shell for hunting ducks or birds, the shot or little balls inside the shell can be made from lead. The shot is made in many sizes for different kinds of hunting and game. In recent years, lead is starting to be phased out in favor of less toxic materials, but lead shot is still being used by many manufacturers.   Lead Diving Weights Scuba divers use weight belts and ankle weights to help offset the natural ballast of the body and the air fill tank they are carrying on their back. The weights are typically made from lead and can be added or removed from the weight belt to compensate for the person’s size and weight. There are many types of weight systems available that can be used by divers and in cases where divers are making very deep dives, the amount of weight they carry can be much higher than that of a standard diver. In all these cases, lead is used for it properties and weight. In wet environments, lead holds up well for years with very little...

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Renting Your First Dumpster For A Room Rehab Project? 2 Things You Need To Know Before Renting One

Posted by on Jan 12, 2017 in Uncategorized |

If you are getting ready to work on your first home renovation project, then you are likely excited and busy planning the new room and choosing new flooring, paint, appliances, and/or furniture that will go in it. However, don’t forget that before those new items are taken into the room, everything currently in it needs to be recycled or disposed of. Most people performing home renovations simply rent a dumpster before starting the project to have a place to put construction debris and other trash quickly and easily during renovation. Before you rent your first dumpster, read on to learn two important facts about dumpster rentals you need to know.  1. Heavy Construction Debris Needs A Separate Dumpster Before “tearing up” the old room to prepare it for new flooring, appliances, and furniture, you need to take note of anything you will be tearing up that is heavy in weight and will need to be put in a special dumpster. Your dumpster rental company can provide you a complete list of materials they consider heavyweight, but it is standard for concrete, bricks, and soil to be considered heavy enough that they need their own dumpster.  Why do you need two dumpsters? Overweight and overfilled dumpsters are a safety hazard to everyone on the road while the dumpster is being hauled away. To make it easier for customers to only load dumpsters to their weight limits without having to weigh materials themselves, “fill lines” are placed on dumpsters. Dumpsters designated for use with heavy items have fill lines that are much lower than those for light items. This prevents dumpster overloading naturally.  2. Don’t Throw Those Old Mattresses in the Dumpster without Prior Approval New laws are popping up all over the country that strictly regulate how mattresses can be disposed of. California, Connecticut, and Rhode Island all currently have laws that designate that old mattresses must be dropped off at specific locations where staff is ready to take them apart and recycle the components of them that can be recycled.  However, if you live outside of these states, that doesn’t mean that you are free to toss your mattresses in a dumpster — while other states may not have enacted these strict mattress recycling laws yet, some cities and towns have.  If you have old mattresses that need to be disposed of during your renovation project and are unsure of the local laws, then simply ask an associate at the dumpster rental company if they accept mattresses in the dumpsters. If there are local laws that require mattresses to be recycled, then the dumpster company may offer to take your mattress and recycle it for you. If there are no local mattress regulations, then they may just instruct you to toss it in the dumpster filled with light items.  If you are embarking on a home renovation project and renting a dumpster to place your construction debris in, then keep these two dumpster rental tips in mind to make sure you don’t accidentally overload a dumpster or throw used mattresses in it if local laws forbid it. For more information, check out a site like...

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Cooking Tips For Your Family’s New Solar Oven

Posted by on Aug 5, 2015 in Uncategorized |

Getting your family’s first solar oven is always an exciting time. Solar ovens are a great way to cook a wide variety of foods while saving on energy costs. Solar cookers are good for the environment, and they do not heat up your house to cook meals for your family.  Here are some tips to help ensure that you get the most from your family’s new solar oven: Tip: Use Black Colored Pots and Pans Black colored pots and pans absorb the most heat and are the best thing that you can use to cook food in your new solar oven. If you do not have any pots or pans that are black, then you can use barbecue grill spray paint to coat the outside of the containers you want to use to cook with. You should never use reflective pans or aluminum foil to cover foods being cooked in a solar oven. The shiny material will reflect the sun’s rays and the interior of your container will not get hot enough to cook the food. Tip: Don’t Tighten Jar Lids While Cooking While black painted canning jars make wonderful cooking containers for a solar oven, you should never tighten their lids while you are cooking foods within them. If you attach a lid to a canning jar and then heat it, the pressure will build in the jar until it explodes or cracks. This is dangerous and can cause permanent damage to your new solar cooker. Tip: Turn the Solar Oven Regularly to Cook Higher-Temperature Foods When you cook foods such as beans, crunchy vegetables, or meat, you will need your solar oven to collect the most solar energy as possible to meet the higher-temperature cooking needs of these foods. To this end, you will have to move your solar oven’s reflector at least every hour so that it has the best solar alignment possible. Tip: Aim the Solar Oven for Maximum Sun in Absences Finally, if you are not going to be at home to turn your solar oven’s reflector towards the sun each hour, then you should face it at a midpoint between where the sun is when you start cooking and where it will be when you anticipate your returning from your errands. This simple technique allows your solar oven to absorb the most solar energy possible from the sun during the time it isn’t being rotated. Follow the solar oven cooking tips above to get the most out of your solar...

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How Asbestos Affects Your Dogs

Posted by on Mar 28, 2015 in Uncategorized |

Asbestos is a highly toxic substance that may be found in different parts of older homes and buildings. It was once used in drywall, flooring tiles, plumbing fixtures, and more. However, it has been known to cause many negative side effects, including a type of cancer of the lungs called mesothelioma. While you may already be aware of how dangerous it is for humans, have you thought about how it affects your dogs? While it is rarer for a dog to suffer this condition, it is still a risk you need to be aware of. Here is more information about mesothelioma, asbestos exposure, and your dogs. How Dogs Get Mesothelioma This lung condition is often the result of exposure to asbestos. Asbestos can be found in vinyl flooring tiles, insulation and drywall, roofing tiles, and plumbing. Dogs get exposure to asbestos in a similar way to humans; by the fibers releasing into the air and the dog inhaling them. So exactly does this happen? Consider what would happen if you didn’t know your home had asbestos, and you began a home remodeling project. While taking down a wall in your home, the asbestos fibers began releasing into the air. You might have a mask on, but your dog could be running around your home and inhaling those dangerous fibers. This is one common way a dog comes into contact with the dangerous compound. Signs That Your Dog Has Been Exposed If your dog has been exposed to asbestos, you might not notice symptoms right away, aside from a cough or irritation of their lungs. However, when it leads to mesothelioma, they will experience a lot off the same symptoms that humans do when they get this lung condition. Some signs to look for include: Fatigue Vomiting Intolerance to Exercise Difficulty Breathing Swelling of the Abdomen Muffled Sounds in the Lungs, Abdomen, and Heart The Diagnosis Process If you notice any of these symptoms, you should bring your dog to the vet right away. Let them know you think your dog may have accidentally been exposed to asbestos. Even if you don’t notice symptoms, you need to bring your dog to the vet if you have found asbestos in your home. There is no telling how much of it was in the air and could have potentially harmed your dog. Your vet needs to know about the asbestos so they can run the right tests. They will begin with a physical examination and ask about the exposure, plus the symptoms they have been experiencing. They will likely try to rule out other reasons for their symptoms, making sure they are not ill for another reason other than the asbestos exposure. Once that is done, the vet will perform a series of tests, including a urinalysis, complete blood count, chemical blood profile, and x-rays. Depending on the results of those tests, they may continue with more testing, including performing a laparoscopy of their abdomen and taking a fluid sample of any fluid found in the dog’s abdomen. How Vets Will Treat Mesothelioma If your dog is diagnosed with mesothelioma, he or she will be treated on an outpatient basis. Your dog will need a quiet place to recover and its physical activity will need to be adjusted based on the dog’s breathing...

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